Posts Tagged 'Bitnami'

EC2 Security Revisited

A couple of weeks ago I was teaching Learning Tree’s Amazon Web Services course at our lovely Chicago area Education Center in Schaumburg, IL. In that class we provision a lot of AWS resources including several machine instances on EC2 for each attendee. Usually everything goes pretty smoothly. That week, however, we received an email from Amazon. They had received a complaint. It seemed that one of the instances we launched was making Denial of Service (DoS) attacks to other remote hosts on the Internet. This is specifically forbidden in the user agreement.

I was doubtful that any of the course attendees were intentionally doing this so I suspected that the machine had been hacked. The machine was based on an AMI from Bitnami and uses public key authentication, though, so it was puzzling how someone could have obtained the private key. Anyway, we immediately terminated the instance and launched a new one to take its place for the rest of the course.

In Learning Tree’s Cloud Security Essentials course we teach that the only way to truly know what is on an AMI is to launch an instance and do an inventory of it. I was pretty sure we had done that for this AMI but we might have missed something. I decided that I would do some further investigation this week when I got a break from teaching.

Serendipitously when I sat down this morning there was another email from Amazon:

>>

Dear AWS Customer,

Your security is important to us.  Bitrock, the creator of the Bitnami AMIs published in the EC2 Public AMI catalog, has made us aware of a security issue in several of their AMIs.  EC2 instances launched from these AMIs are at increased risk of access by unauthorized parties.  Specifically, AMIs containing PHP versions 5.3.x before 5.3.12 and 5.4.x before 5.4.2 are vulnerable and susceptible to attacks via remote code execution.   It appears you are running instances launched from some of the affected AMIs so we are making you aware of this security issue. This email will help you quickly and easily address this issue.

This security issue is described in detail at the following link, including information on how to correct the issue, how to detect signs of unauthorized access to an instance, and how to remove some types of malicious code:

http://wiki.bitnami.com/security/2013-11_PHP_security_issue

Instance IDs associated with your account that were launched with the affected AMIs include:

(… details omitted …)

Bitrock has provided updated AMIs to address this security issue which you can use to launch new EC2 instances.  These updated AMIs can be found at the following link:

http://bitnami.com/stack/roller/cloud/amazon

If you do not wish to continue using the affected instances you can terminate them and launch new instances with the updated AMIs.

Note that Bitnami has removed the insecure AMIs and you will no longer be able to launch them, so you must update any CloudFormation templates or Autoscaling groups that refer to the older insecure AMIs to use the updated AMIs instead.

(… additional details omitted …)

<<

So it seems there was a security issue in the AMI that had gone undetected. This is not uncommon as new exploits are continually discovered. That is why software must be continually patched and updated with the latest service releases. Since Amazon EC2 is an Infrastructure as a Service offering (IaaS) this is the user’s responsibility.

It was nice to have a resolution to the issue since it had been bothering me since it occurred. It was also nice that Amazon sent out this email and specifically identified instances that could have a problem. They also gave links to some specific instructions I could follow to harden each instance or a new AMI I could use to replace them.

In the end I think we will be replacing the AMI we use in the course. This situation was an example of the shared responsibility for security that exists between the cloud provider and the cloud consumer. You don’t always know exactly if you have a potential security issue until you look for it. Even then you may not be totally sure until something actually happens. In this case once the threat was identified the cloud provider moved quickly to mitigate damage.

Kevin Kell


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